Spiders – Are They a Problem

Spider on siding in the Mississippi gulf coast; Southern Pest Control


spiders

There are 21 unique species of spiders found in Mississippi. Most of these are unable to puncture human skin, and if they do, their venom is not generally harmful to humans. There are three main species in Mississippi that health officials worry about — the Black Widow, Brown Recluse and now the Brown Widow.

For lots of people, encountering one of these eight-legged creatures can be a fearful experience. Many people hate the thought of having spiders in their homes, but indoor and outdoor they can provide value. Spiders primarily feast on other insects and are actually quite helpful in controlling insect populations, as well as potential infestations of other types of more harmful pests.

There is also the misconception that all should exist outside of the home, and that it is unnatural for them to be inside. In actuality, there are both indoor and outdoor types of spiders. Almost every type of indoor spider species lives exclusively indoors, as they do not have the ability to survive in an outdoor setting. Likewise, many outdoor spider species live exclusively outdoors for similar reasons. Most indoor spider species are carried into the home through egg sacks that are attached to items that are brought in from one space to another. Most spiders are quite harmless; spiders are more interested in eating other bugs than in causing harm to humans.

One of the most common questions that people ask is whether or not they are poisonous. The majority are indeed poisonous, in the sense that they contain venom, which they use to paralyze and kill their prey. Even though most spiders contain poisonous venom, it is a small threat to humans, as their fangs are often not long enough to break through average human skin. As stated previously of all of the species of spiders commonly found in Mississippi, there are only three that you should ever have to really worry about: the infamous Black Widow spider, the Brown Recluse , the Brown Widow.

We at Southern Pest Control are here when spiders become a concern at your home or office. We have been ridding people in the Gulf Coast Region for over 37 years, with a trained professional staff. Please visit our website at www.southernpestcontrol.biz to meet our team and the services we offer.



Keep Unwanted Christmas Pests Out

Christmas Tree in the Mississippi gulf coast; Southern Pest Control

Christmas Tree Pests

Keep Unwanted Christmas Pests Out

In rare circumstances, the Christmas tree that you bought on the lot can come with holiday pests. There are a couple types of Christmas tree pests: those that actually feed on the tree and that are pests from the tree growers, and those that are just hitchhiking on the tree.

The two most common grower pests are spruce spider mites and aphids. The white pine aphid is a black insect that can be found on pine trees. These grower pests are usually killed by treatment before the trees are cut for sale. Growers say that only about one in 100,000 cut trees are accidentally shipped with pests. If you cut your own tree or greens, you’re much more likely to be bringing home some harmless Christmas tree pests.

Christmas Trees Can Hide Hitchhikers

The second group of pests is those that have crawled into the tree looking for shelter. These include spiders, sowbugs, ants, and beetles. These pests may have been hiding in the tree when cut or may have moved in during transport, storage on the lot, or even while the tree sat in your yard for a couple of days. A evergreen tree provides winter shelter for all kinds of pests. Once the tree is moved indoors, the insects become active again. Sometimes a praying mantis will lay an egg case on a branch. It looks like a beige chunk of Styrofoam. Simply cut it out and dispose of it.

This makes it sound like all Christmas trees are infested with pests.  Most of the time, the tree won’t have any pests. None of the Christmas tree pests can cause any damage to your home, they don’t bite or sting, they are simply nuisance pests. Remove the pests by hand or vacuum up those that have left the tree. They won’t reproduce in your home either since most will die quickly once they are in a drier indoor environment.

Inspect Before You Buy or Cut Your Tree

Look for aphids or other small insects along the branches ,where the branches meet the trunk. Look for spider webs and look at the bottom of the branches, too. Look for powder-like sawdust and tiny holes on the trunk that are an indication of bark beetles. Bring a flashlight if you’re shopping at night.

When You Get the Tree Home

Before you bring your tree inside, shake the tree and pound the base of the trunk on the ground to remove any insects or spiders. Cut out any egg cases. Remove dead needles and debris. You can even hose down the tree if temperatures are above freezing.

By: RAMP | Your Real Advertising and Marketing Partner